Tag Archives: Dr. Madigane

Women Leaders of PEI

I maintain a blog for the Stewart Memorial Healthcare Auxiliary (we just turned 70 – read all about it!). Dawn Wilson, the Executive Director of the PEI Coalition for Women in Government, contacted our email address last summer looking for a contact for the family of Dr. Joyce Madigane.

Dr. Madigane was a family doctor, OB/GYN and medical director at Stewart Memorial Hospital for nearly 40 years until her death in 2014. She was also my doctor for much of my life and a family friend.

Dawn wanted to ask Dr. Madigane’s family if the Coalition could include her in a series of colouring pages they were developing of Island women leaders as part of their Commemorating Island Women’s Political History project. I was happy to be able to make that connection for her. Dawn also encouraged me to send along a favourite photo of Dr. Madigane that I might have.

My connection to Stewart Memorial goes back to my grandmother, who was the first cook when the hospital opened in 1951, and my father, who helped raise funds for the hospital’s construction and was later on the board of directors. As a volunteer myself since 2002, I became “that person” who collected information and artefacts about our hospital, especially after it closed in 2013.

With the help of my friend, Fran Sark, we nominated Dr. Madigane for the Order of Prince Edward Island, which she received only four months before she died after a brief illness. I had the privilege to introduce Dr. Madigane at Government House the night she received her honour, and I was then humbled to be asked to speak at her funeral. I am now on a committee of our Auxiliary that gives three scholarships each year to people from our area who are pursuing education in healthcare-related fields.

I found the photo of Dr. Madigane I sent to Dawn in an album at the hospital years ago. It shows Dr. Madigane in 1978, just four years after she arrived on PEI from England. I’m not sure where the photo was taken, though by the snow outside the window behind her and that big red bow on the box of Turtles, I guess it was taken around Christmas. She is wearing one of her beautiful trademark headscarves. Dr. Madigane was beautiful and smart and funny. You can see all of that and more in the photo.

Dr. Joyce Madigane, Tyne Valley, 1978

Dawn emailed yesterday to tell me that Dr. Madigane’s family were very supportive of the project and liked the photo I had sent. Island artist Renee Laprise created the colouring page of Dr. Madigane from the photo, and I love it so much: the added stethoscope (which Dr. Madigane did often have around her neck), the tree just like the beautiful mountain ash that stands outside the old hospital, the beautiful drapery, and the transformation of the box of chocolates to a weighty book. She joins other fantastic Island women in a learning resource that will help teach young people about the contributions women have made to Island life.

I’m happy they called her “beloved” in the description of her page, because she was. She was so full of life, so fearless and steadfast. We still miss her, and likely always will.

I think she’d be tickled to be included with these other great women, some of whom she knew well, like Catherine Callbeck, who was the provincial minister of health early in Dr. Madigane’s time on PEI, and who gave a beautiful tribute to Dr. Madigane in the Senate. Dr. Madigane was one in a million, a great Islander, and I’m glad a new generation of young people will get to know her, too.

Zimbabwe, PEI

Top Internet searches across Atlantic Canada today will probably be for terms like “Dorian” and “what is an emergency kit again?” as we scramble to remove potential outdoor projectiles and gather supplies as a hurricane speeds northward.

The trend bots might note a strange blip in the area around Tyne Valley this morning as those who knew Dr. Joyce Madigane awaken to the news that former Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe has died. You didn’t need to know Dr. Madigane well or for long to find out her feelings about her former countryman. She wasn’t a fan, to put it mildly.

I remember one of the last conversations I had with her in 2013. Mugabe must have been in the news for some outrageous thing or another (there were too many to recall), and I had asked for her thoughts. She told me what a hero he had been as a freedom fighter against white rule in Rhodesia, and lamented that his intelligence and boundless energy had later been used to oppress those he had fought to free, all while enriching himself and his family. She said wryly that he would outlive us all.

He did outlive Dr. Madigane, who died in 2014, so she didn’t get to see him unrepentantly resign in 2017 (or the sweet deals he and his family received for him stepping aside). She was too kind and professional to ever wish anyone ill, but I can’t help wondering how she would have been feeling today.